Participation in Side Events

No:

006

Title

Overleaf to Write Scientific Articles

Organizers

Taoufik Ksiksi
UAE University, United Arab Emirates
tksiksi@uaeu.ac.ae

Abstract

This is a hands-on workshop on using overleaf online interface to write scientific papers and reports. The workshop will guide participants on step-by-step procedures from choosing the journal to submitting the paper to preferred publisher. LATEX writing protocol is used with Overleaf.
This is for anyone with a laptop, internet connection and willingness to learn how to use LATEX coding.

 

No:

012

Title

Evaluation of the Negative Effect of Crude Oil Pollution in the Ecosystem, Food Chain and Significant Environmental Concern in the Niger-Delta Area

Organizers

Okoye Amara
Africa Centre of Excellence-Centre for Oilfield Chemicals Research, (ACE-CEFOR), University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria
amcy4uk@yahoo.com

Abstract

The leakage of crude oil by anthropogenic activities (exploration, extraction, refining, transport, and use of petroleum and derivative products) has exposed the soil, water and damages the biological systems residing in the soil, water including microorganisms and plants. This has negatively affected the ecosystem, food chain and is of significant environmental concern in the Niger-Delta area. Crude Oil pollution in Niger Delta, Nigeria is one of the most unsafe pollution factors. This has caused severe environmental and human consequences. Oil spill on land may lead to retardation of vegetation growth and caused soil infertility. The oil has found its way deep into the village wells, and all along the lengthy network of creeks, swamps, mangrove forests and rivers that surround the Niger delta. Films of crude oil are seen on the surface of the seawater indicating that this marine ecosystem is constantly exposed to petroleum hydrocarbons.

 

No:

017

Title

Designing Life: Synthetic Biology in Action

Organizers

Aditi Mankad
CSIRO, Australia
aditi.mankad@csiro.au

Abstract

This Side Event workshop will focus on scenario-testing synthetic biology innovations in real-life settings. We will consider a future where synthetic biology applications are being used to design more resilient environments and ecosystems. Workshop attendees will be presented with different ‘future scenarios’ and have the opportunity to discuss and evaluate possible risks, solutions and implementation considerations. Example scenarios will include synthetic biology technologies for ecological sustainability (e.g. climate resilient coral), biodiversity and biological conservation (e.g. gene drive technology for invasive species management), and bioremediation (e.g. pseudo-organisms for pollution management). The event will aim to attract a diverse range of Eco Summit attendees representing a variety of experiences and expertise, to consider the social and ethical implications of biotechnical innovations including risk management, technology regulation, community impacts (e.g. indigenous perspectives), social license, responsible technology development and implementation, and consequent social-behavioural changes.

 

No:

021

Title

Use of Naturally Occurring Compounds for Gas Hydrate Inhibition as a Means of Ecosystem Preservation Especially in Deep Offshore Environment of the Niger Delta Region

Organizers

Elechi Virtue Urunwo
World Bank Africa Centre of Excellence for Oilfield Chemicals Research (ACE-CEFOR), University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria
elechivirtue@yahoo.com

Abstract

Natural Gas hydrates are non-stochiometric crystalline structures that are formed when water encapsulates hydrocarbon gases such as methane, ethane, propane, and butane and some non-hydrocarbon gases like carbon dioxide, Nitrogen and hydrogen sulphide under low temperature and high-pressure conditions in the presence of water. These structures are impediments to the flow of oil and gas in the oil and gas industries therefore mitigating their occurrences is key. If allowed to form, they have tremendous impact on the operating expenditures. The conventional method that is widely used is the chemical methods which are subdivided into thermodynamic (THIs) and Low dosage hydrate inhibitors (LDHIs). These conventional hydrate inhibitors are expensive and toxic to the environment especially deep offshore. In line with the SDG goals and clamor for green environment, there is the need to develop naturally occurring compounds that are biodegradable, readily available in commercial quantity and eco-friendly.

 

No:

024

Title

Scenario Analysis for Evaluating Transformation: Mobilizing Transdisciplinarity for Transformative Sustainable Urban Development

Organizers

Adam P Hejnowicz
University of York, UK
adam.hejnowicz@york.ac.uk

Abstract

Achieving sustainable, transformative change requires multiple co-aligned actions and unconventional, innovative ways of working. Evaluation for Transformation is concerned with informing transitions to sustainability and is relevant to all SDGs, as integrated pathways for achieving Agenda 2030 require robust evaluation of the evidence for progress across all areas. Our purpose in proposing this side event is two-fold: 1) To demonstrate how transformational evaluative practices can be mobilised across diverse epistemic communities, leverage multiple sectors and emphasize integrated policymaking to deliver Agenda 2030; and 2) To expose participants to Participatory Scenario Planning (PSP), an innovative methodology for allowing stakeholders to creatively envision and plan for diverse, plausible and coherent futures for sustainable transformation. Grounding the ideas presented in (1) in real-world practice, we will apply PSP to consider SDG Goal 11: "Make human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable" and targets linked to the environment (e.g., 11.3 (spatial development), 11.7 (green spaces), 11a (rural-urban linkages), 11b (risk reduction)).

 

No:

025

Title

Effects of Topography on Soil Organic Carbon of Afforestation on the Loess Plateau

Organizers

Xiaofang Zhang
Northwest Normal University, China
15726487062@163.com

Abstract

Afforestation is regarded as an important strategy to sequester carbon and reduce soil erosion on China’s Loess Plateau, where topography is a primary factor influencing the distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore how topography affect SOC. Soil samples were obtained from locations on the Loess Plateau which had supported apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) growth for 16 years and differed in slope gradient (14º ≤ S < 20º, 20º ≤ S < 25º, or 25° ≤ S ≤ 31º) and aspect (sunny or semi-sunny vs. shady or semi-shady) at six depth (0-0.1, 0.1-0.2, 0.2-0.4, 0.4-0.6, 0.6-0.8, 0.8-1.0 m). The results showed that across a depth of 1.0 m, mean SOC and total soil carbon storage TCS were 7.23 g kg-1 and 77.41 Mg ha-1, respectively, under a shady slope, and 6.81 g kg-1 and 74.22 Mg ha-1, under a sunny slope. Both SOC and TCS increased with slope gradient, with SOC rising from 6.68 to 7.01 to 7.34 g kg-1, while TCS rose from 72.60 to 75.35 to 79.40 Mg ha-1. Slope gradient and aspect interacted in influencing SOC, but not TCS. Across both slope gradient and aspects, roughly half of TCS was found within the first 0.4 m depth of soil. The results of the current study support enhanced understanding of the effects of topographical factors and their interaction on the distribution of SOC, and will be of importance for SOC protection and implementation of afforestation on the Loess Plateau.

 

No:

028

Title

Eco-Safety Measures in Agricultural Production Potentiality

Organizers

Prakash Kumar
Neo-INDIA Service Mirror Charitable Trust (R), India
publicservicehsn@gmail.com

Abstract

Agriculture is the Primary Sector. Different farming practices have immense effect on production potentiality of crop plants and also have environmental impacts affecting the ecosystem in and around. Several negative impacts have already caused notable hazards on soil and water ecosystem. It’s important to trace those effects, to modify adoption practices which are leading to such effects and finally to minimize the environmental imbalances affecting on agriculture in retaining the sustainability and the productivity potentiality. The environmental impact of agriculture varies based on the wide variety of agricultural practices employed around the world. Ultimately, the environmental impact depends on the production practices of the system used by farmers. It’s also important to counter the direct and indirect variables affecting on other climate variables such as rainfall and temperature. The environmental impact of agriculture involves a variety of factors from the soil, water, air, animal, people, plants, and the food itself. Some of the environmental issues that are related to agriculture are climate change, deforestation, genetic engineering, irrigation based problematic soil, soil and water conservation, pollutants, soil degradation and waste. These issues can be resolved by public sector and semi-public sector bodies besides policies. The same issues shall be addressed in the side event which envisages to ecologically safe and sustainable agriculture keeping the production potentiality worldwide.

 

No:

029

Title

Energy, Environment and Globalization: An Interface with Reference to India

Organizers

Anshuman Gupta
University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, India
anshumang@ddn.upes.ac.in

Abstract

Energy, environment and globalization are inter-related through many channels. However, their causal relationship seems to be unidirectional. The globalization leads to economic development through allocative efficiency, specialization and innovations on the premise of absolute / comparative advantage. It, in turn, results into more uses of energy, especially fossil fuels owing to their easy availability, leading to degradation of environment. Globalization also has favorable impact on environment via import of environment- friendly technologies and better environmental standards
This side event would try to find answer of the following questions:
- What are the possible sources of interaction among energy, environment and globalization.
- What is the status of India in each source of interaction among three.
- The Government initiatives for mitigating local pollutions.
- The government interventions for mitigating global pollutants like Greenhouse gases.
- Political interaction with energy, environment and globalization.
- WTO and environment

 

No:

032

Title

Adapting Natural and Cultural Heritage to Climate Change

Organizers

Sandra Fatoric
Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
s.fatoric@tudelft.nl

Abstract

- Are scientific community and decision makers identifying climate change vulnerabilities or risks to natural and cultural heritage?
- Are there any climate adaptation policies being implemented for natural and cultural heritage?
- What are some best practices and lessons learnt that natural and cultural heritage hold in terms of climate resilience?
- Is the scientific community focusing on bridging the gap between natural and cultural heritage conservation and climate risk mitigation?
- What are the most important barriers to current natural and cultural heritage climate adaptation?
- Do practitioners have enough knowledge, technical expertise for addressing climate change risks to natural and cultural heritage?
- How are various stakeholders including communities dealing with natural and cultural heritage loss?

 

No:

040

Title

Extracting Drainage Structures from LiDAR Point Cloud Data to Produced Hydro-Enforced DEM

Organizers

Nadeem Fareed
National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan
nadeemfareed@yahoo.com

Abstract

The vitality of road infrastructure for humans good is a well-established fact. Drainage structures (bridges and culverts) are the backbone of a road and railway infrastructure. However, a significant portion of drainage structures is hidden underneath roads and railway lines. Unfortunately, the geographic location of these hidden assets is generally unknown to authorities, thereby creating trouble for timely maintenance and result in catastrophic failure. Drainage structures datasets also have a significant contribution in hydrology and related disciplines. These assets are usually located by ground-based surveys by putting a huge burden on public funds and human resources. Alternatively, these assets are geolocated by remote sensing technology. Existing methods are manual or semi-automated to locate drainage structures with incomplete results. Therefore, these methods are used in conjunction with ground-based surveys. In this article, an automated method has been designed to extract comprehensive drainage structures dataset using Airborne Laser Scanning technology (ALS) along with road centerline dataset. The basic idea behind this research work is to remove the roads and railway lines from ALS point cloud to produce a Hydrology Restored-DEM (HR-DEM). HR-DEM is then used to extract the uninterrupted stream network. The intersection points between the extracted stream network and road centerline dataset give the objective locations of drainage structures. The whole workflow has been formulated and automated in ArcGIS model builder.

 

No:

043

Title

Effect of Landfill Leachate on the Hydromechanical Behavior of Bentonite-Sandy Soils Mixture

Organizers

Abdellah Demdoum 
Université Amar Telidji Laghouat, Algeria
a.demdoum@lagh-univ.dz

Abstract

Saturated hydraulic conductivity and unconfined compressive strength of a typical liner material used in the landfill should not be: higher than 10 -9 m/s and less than 200 kPa respectively. The first step in this study consists in presenting the physical, chemical and mechanical properties results of tuff, calcareous sand (crushed rocks waste) and bentonite used for the experiment, which is available local materials in Laghouat (in the south Algeria) and Maghnia (Tlemcen) regions respectively. After that, a study of the hydraulic characteristics on the mixtures containing 10% bentonite + % calcareous sand + % tuff was conducted through falling-head permeability and oedometre tests (under the effect of water and leachate). The results showed that the tuff addition led to a decrease in hydraulic conductivity up to 70%, beyond this percentage, the hydraulic conductivity increases. A mechanical study of the characteristics of these mixtures compacted with the optimum Normal Proctor condition was carried out by means of unconfined compression test and tensile splitting test. The results of unconfined compressive strength and tensile splitting tests at the age of 90 days reached 1400 kPa and 170 kPa respectively, for mixtures containing 80% and 70% tuff. The effect of leachate on mechanical behaviour is slightly increased compared to uncontaminated mixtures. Finally, results show that a mixture of 10% bentonite, 20% calcareous sand and 70% tuff meet the requirements of hydraulic conductivity and strength mechanical.

 

No:

054

Title

Queensland Shark Bite Mitigation Stakeholder Group

Organizers

Jonathan Clark
Sea Shepherd, Australia
qld_sharks@seashepherd.org.au

Abstract

This stakeholder group will consist of individuals and organisations working to offer non-lethal alternatives to the current lethal shark bite mitigation practices of the Queensland and NSW Governments.
Objectives:
To bear influence on state government to implement mitigation practices that are environmentally sustainable, non-lethal, effective in improving safety and economically viable.
To further public education about sharks to increase understanding and reduce fear.
To further the interests of marine environments by advocating for non-lethal mitigation techniques.
To foster investigation and development of shark bite mitigation methods that are effective at making beaches safer and reducing impacts in marine life.
The stakeholder group aims to offer a joint statement to Governments (Federal, Qld, NSW and WA), advocating scientifically backed non-lethal shark bite mitigation strategies.

 

No:

055

Title

Integrated Ecosystem Service Models – ARIES Approach

Organizers

Ferdinando Villa1, Stefano Balbi1, Kiichiro Hayashi2
1Basque Centre for Climate Change, Spain
2Nagoya University, Japan
maruhaya98--@nagoya-u.jp

Abstract

The ARIES (ARtificial Intelligence for Ecosystem Services) project represents a promising tool for ecosystem service modelling, utilizing semantics and ontology systems. ARIES can model and visualize many kinds of ecosystem services aspects, such as natural capital, ecosystem processes, human beneficiary distribution and ecosystem service flows to society. In addition, ARIES flexibly combines a variety of ecosystem assessment tools, such as multi-criteria analysis, machine learning, Bayesian networks, etc. An artificially intelligent engine is used for collecting and computing the designated concept and outputs. ARIES currently includes several global ecosystem service models, including carbon storage, pollination, flood regulation, outdoor recreation sediment retention, etc. In this session, several AREIS applications will be presented.

 

No:

056

Title

Cultivating Santushti (Contentment) in Agricultural Production

Organizers

Pramod Singh Negi
Ambedkar University, India
negisinghpramod89@gmail.com

Abstract

As an action researcher (M.Phil Development Practice, Centre for Development Practice, Ambedkar University) I am presently immersed with the Kabir Panthis of Kaliga, a village in Gumla district of Jharkhand state. These Panthis who are followers of Kabir and celebrate his philosophy in their Satsang gatherings live a life of dis-satisfaction and contradiction. Despite realizing the unpleasant consequences of using chemical enhancers of productivity, they continue their usage but also feel dis-satisfied both with the produce as well as their ethic of relationship with land.
The discontent in the life of these farmers is absence in the popular imagination, therefore neither politicized nor publicized. I ask a fundamental question can popular development discourse give space to contentment which is necessary for the wellbeing of the community as well as Environment.

 

No:

058

Title

Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems: A Socio-Ecological Systems Approach

Organizers

Kristin Drexler
American Public University System, USA
kristin.drexler@mycampus.apus.edu

Abstract

Agroecology, the science, planning, and practice of sustainable food production, is necessary for food security in a growing population. This proposed side event is partly modeled on a study involving indigenous Maya (“milpa”) farmers in Belize; the sustainability of their traditional “slash-and-burn” farming system is uncertain as their milpas expand deeper into forests, impacting the ecosystem for which they depend for their basic needs. This study examined farmer perceptions of agroecology practices using a socio-ecological systems (SES) framework. SES examines multiple aspects and linkages, including social, economic, cultural, governance, and other factors. The findings imply sustainable agroecology practices necessitate government involvement and action to facilitate sustainable food systems and food and livelihood security.

 

No:

059

Title

Automated Monitoring and Management of Marine Ecosystems

Organizers

Ryan Pearson
Griffith University, Australia
r.pearson@griffith.edu.au

Abstract

Marine ecosystems are threatened globally. Reducing the impact of natural and anthropogenic stressors requires innovative monitoring methods to inform effective and efficient management. R&D at the intersection of Industry 4.0, the Internet of Things and artificial intelligence (e.g. machine learning) is providing new opportunities to create and implement these solutions. This is empowering scientists and natural resource managers to begin tackling critical challenges facing marine ecosystems in ways that were previously impossible. Examples include: predicting environmental conditions with high precision to distant time horizons; quantifying changes in habitat quality and quantity at high resolutions; and, enforcing commercial fisheries quotas in real time. This panel discussion will synthesise advances in automated monitoring and consider the implications for future management of marine ecosystems.

 

No:

064

Title

Re-imagining Ocean Governance in a Wicked Future: Early Career Perspectives on Environmental Disruption, Technological Innovation, and Political Contests

Organizers

Carolina Contreras
The University of Melbourne, Australia
carolina.contreras@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

In coming decades governance of marine areas and resources will face challenges and opportunities arising from environmental disruption (acidification, plastic pollution, hypoxia, ecosystem shifts), technological innovation (renewable energy, floating cities, oceanic aquaculture, carbon sequestration), and political contests (for resources and access in areas such as the South China Sea and the exclusive economic zones of the Pacific Large Ocean States). This workshop will invite early career researchers (PhD candidates and postdoctoral researchers) to present their work on any one of these three themes, with a focus on trade-offs in governance futures. Who wins, who loses, what changes? Key questions might include:
• What strategic responses are needed to respond to environmental crises such as marine plastics, ‘dead zones’ and collapsing coral reefs?
• What are the opportunities and challenges of the Pacific Island countries, imagined not as ‘Small Island’ but ‘Large Ocean’ States?
• What is the potential role and contribution of floating cities?

 

No:

065

Title

Biological Invasions of Nano-Fertilizer for Moisture Retention, Crop Productivity and Soil Health Maintenance

Organizers

J. C. Tarafdar
BCKV, Kalyani, India
jctarafdar@yahoo.in

Abstract

We have successfully prepared bio-synthesized nano-nutrients for plant nutrition with the help of fungal protein which was tested on 17 different crops under different agro-ecological and soil conditions in research and farmers field conditions. The results were very encouraging and on an average 24-35% grain yield and 30% dry matter yield on foliar application to plants was noticed. The technology was patented and enhances nutrient use efficiency by three to twenty times as compared to the conventional fertilizers. The synthesized nanoparticles enter through cuticle or stomata and triggers the different enzyme systems resulted 30-253% more release of different beneficial enzymes resulted more rhizosphere nutrient mobilization. It enhances polysaccharide producing microbial population in the rhizosphere resulted 33-83% more soil aggregation, 10-14% more moisture retention and 3-5% more carbon build up in the soil. It requires 80-100 times less than chemical fertilizer and helps 10 times more stress tolerant to the crops. No adverse effect with recommended doses of application was seen on seed germination, soluble seed protein content, microbial diversity in the rhizosphere, nanoparticle concentration in seeds, histopathological analysis on liver, kidney and spleen and gene ontology distribution of unigenes. No abnormal clinical signs, behavioral activity were observed in animals which received bio-synthesized nanotreated material as well as due to intake of bio-nano food.

 

No:

071

Title

Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Sustainably

Organizers

Lufei Huang
Shanghai University, China
huanglufei@shu.edu.cn

Abstract

The nexus of innovation, entrepreneurship and sustainably is a hot topic nowadays, as academic, industry and society communities are all seeking better solutions leading to sustainable development. A series of green innovations have been developed. A large number of entrepreneurs are committed to improving organizational performance through innovation. Various administrations have also formulated policies and regulations to improve the sustainable performance of society. The motivation for the proposed side event is to attract researchers to share ideas and best practices from micro model building to macro policy evaluation under the topic of innovation and sustainability.

 

No:

075

Title

Marine Conservation: Education for and from Young People

Organizers

Bernd Brauer
Stockholm University Alumni, Sweden
nb_admin@icloud.com

Abstract

The increase in plastics and micro plastics in our Oceans and Coastal Ecosystems is reaching epidemic levels. At the same time, awareness of the problems and the need to address them is growing, especially with the advent of international youth-led activism (e.g. Greta Thunberg's climate change movement and the Our Children's Trust - Youth vs US Government Court Action). New Beginnings Youth organisation is leading the field in introducing young people in Australia to the need to conserve and protect our pristine Marine Environment. This discussion forum will explore new ways to strengthen the climate change movement amongst young people in Australia.

 

No:

086

Title

Coastal Conservation

Organizers

Lydia Biri Nasimiyu
University of Twente-ITC, The Netherlands
lydianbiri@gmail.com

Abstract

Promoting research and development to enhance sustainable nature-based enterprises in the marine world. For instance, promote research for different types of shellfish/ fish and other marine food as an alternative thus creating sustainable production.

 

No:

088

Title

Innovative Technologies for Ecosystem Restoration

Organizers

Benjamin Robinson
Outreach Network for Gene Drive Research, Canada
ben@emergingag.com

Abstract

In light of the 2019 Global Assessment Report published by IPBES, this side event will consider what role new approaches and technologies could play in turning the rising tide of ecosystem degradation, biodiversity loss and species extinctions. The IPBES report has made clear that transformational changes will be needed in our approaches to ecosystem restoration and conservation if our environmental goals are to be achieved. New technologies that could make significant contributions to these changes are already being developed around the world, including new ways of controlling invasive species, improving resilience to climate change, and managing pathogens that threaten endangered organisms. This session will examine the progress that has been made to date, and the key questions that must still be answered if their promise is to be fulfilled.

 

No:

092

Title

Visualizing Futures, and How to Get There

Organizers

Ian Bishop1 and Katherine Foo2
1University of Melbourne, Australia
2Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI)
i.bishop@unimelb.edu.au
kfoo@wpi.edu

Abstract

Landscape visualization is a powerful way to frame, investigate, analyze, and communicate complex socio-environmental problems. In particular, echoing C.S. Holling’s two cultures of ecology, there are two cultures of visualization that support distinct functions in research: an analytical culture and an integrative culture. Richard Levins identified necessary trade-offs in modeling precision, generality, and realism in population biology. Likewise, analytical visualization enables socio-ecological modeling valuing qualities of precision and generality, whereas integrative visualization fosters socio-ecological modeling that prioritizes qualities of realism and generality. The analytical tradition features data-driven visualization, which tends to be abstracted from localized conditions, whereas the integrative tradition presents realistic representations that communicate well to place-based audiences. Thus, neither tradition alone is sufficient to pursue integrative research, but together they are highly complementary. A combined approach may depict socio-ecological conditions that are simultaneously precise, general, and realistic.
In this symposium, presenters will share empirical work that explores both analytical and integrative modes of visualization, and especially their combination, in order to best depict specific socio-ecological problems in a way that simultaneously conveys precision, generality, and realism. In particular, presenters will address the role of visualization in consideration of the future: What may it be like? What is achievable? How do we get there? Specific themes to be discussed include visualizing uncertainty, scale, and time through analytical and integrative modes.

 

No:

099

Title

High Performance Porous Bio-Cemented Pile

Organizers

Hassan Badiee
Iran University of Science and Technology, Iran
hassan_badiee@yahoo.com

Abstract

This side event aims to introduce the use of recycled concrete aggregates (RCA), as the main portions of construction and demolition wastes, to produce and study the engineering properties of Bio-RCA-Pile by the novel method of Microbially Induced Carbonate precipitation (MICP). Finally, the results compared to those produced with natural aggregates (NA) and Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). The study would be advantageous for the future of the green construction and also as an element which can be used as soil improvement and soil remediation technique.

 

No:

106

Title

Education for Sustainability: Creating Resilient Youth Leaders

Organizers

Katie Norman
Sustainable Schools Network, Australia
katie.norman@ssn.org.au

Abstract

Creating resilient young leaders is critical for a sustainable future. How do we design and deliver education systems that empower youth and ensure the development of critical thinking and creativity? Education is an important factor in the global sustainability agenda and this side event will seek input from stakeholders to develop new ideas for policy makers regarding the system changes required for sustainability education.

 

No:

110

Title

A Multi-Criteria Decision-Aiding Approach to Designing Sustainable Marine Itineraries

Organizers

Olga Porro
UPC Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain
olga.porro@upc.edu 

Abstract

Vies Braves (VBs), sea swimming lanes, is an innovative enterprise dedicated to the design, the promotion and the social and environmental revitalization of marine and open water itineraries. There are currently 26 coastal towns in Catalonia (Spain) with a Via Brava in its territory, representing a total of 25,7 km. A VB has an immediate impact on the environment since parts of the sea are protected throughout the months of more touristic pressure. VB also generates a direct impact on citizens health since swimming and snorkeling are healthy sports activities and education as marine environmental learning experiences are organized in several VBs specially for young teenagers during summer time. Currently, the management team’s strategic priority is the implementation of new Vies Braves in new coastal locations. More specifically, they seek to expand to other international coastal locations, beyond Spain and beyond Europe.
In our study, we propose a multi-criteria decision-aiding approach, using hesitant fuzzy linguistic terms (HFLTS) to study main economic, environmental and social impact criteria, which govern the selection of potential coastal locations where the implementation of a Via Brava fits best with the coastal town’s profile. HFLTSs structures are appropriate in sorting processes because they allow experts to use flexible linguistic expressions close to human being's cognitive models. The main objective of this study is to use a multi-criteria decision-aiding approach based on HFLTs to analyze the viability of new potential coastal locations where the implementation of a VB can make the greatest positive social/environmental impact.
https://viesbraves.com/en

 

No:

122

Title

Research and Partnerships for securing our Water Future

Organizers

Anthony Jakeman and Lorrae van Kerkhoff
Australian National University, Australia
tony.jakeman@anu.edu.au
lorrae.vankerkhoff@anu.edu.au

Abstract

This side event aims to bring together scientists, policy makers and interested stakeholders to discuss how Australia and the region identify pathways to transition to a more secure water future. The premise is that interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches are required that engage appropriate interest groups proactively in identifying issues, problem framing, conceptual and systems modelling of futures, management and communication of uncertainties and trade-offs. Thus, we will bring together 'industry' representatives and scientists working on such first order issues as water allocation in the Murray-Darling Basin and water quality in the Great Barrier Reef catchments. We will produce a paper that distils key policy challenges and opportunities that warrant foresighting exercises which generate a shared understanding of candidate pathways and associated socio-environmental outcomes.

 

No:

128

Title

Using of Waste Glass Powder in Fabrication of Concrete Members

Organizers

James Hassado Haido
University of Duhok, Iraq
james.haido@uod.ac  

Abstract

Concrete material is the widely used today in various constructional applications, in the world, such as buildings, dams, bridges, sidewalks etc. The use of the recycled waste materials in concrete structures is among the most attractive procedures because of the large amount of consumption of the materials. Glass is the man-made material which is used since ancient era. It is fabricated in different forms namely flat glass, container glass, bulb glass and others with limited life of usage. Thus, waste glass needs to be recycled and reused in order to protect environment, where this material is considered as a completely recyclable waste without any loss in quality. Rapid modernization and urbanization in many cities around the world have great impact in increasing the rate of municipal solid waste materials especially in the developing countries. Recently, there have been modern growing ideas about the environmental influences of the management of waste solids and its entailed costs. As a result of increased amount of 2-4% of waste glass in Kurdistan Region, the depositing in landfills of this waste material is regarded one of the major environmental issue. On the other hand, it is worth to mention that the shortage in the local natural sand is in annual increasing. Recently, some researches were launched to utilize the waste materials are replacement of natural aggregate used in concrete constructions to produce green structures. A comprehensive experimental program is essential to measure long term experimental tests for these structures.

 

No:

130

Title

Climate Alteration and its Deleterious Effect on Emigration

Organizers

Opeyemi Marcellina Aderinto1 and Tunji John Asaolu2
1African Centre for Human Advancement Social and Community Development, Nigeria
2African Union Economic Social and Cultural Council, Nigeria
Degerouges@yahoo.com
Asaolutj@yahoo.com    

Abstract

The climate alteration or change has brought about multiple crisis at various locations or areas on earth. The climate crisis is however not a forecast anymore but rather it has been a devastating, too frequent and destructive.
Due to the change, the increasing warm temperature of the ocean brings about a warmer and drier weather. This simply indicates that forests in some regions can’t resist fire and are not hospitable to animals.
However, both mitigation and adaptation are needed to address climate change. adaptation and mitigation can be said to work hand in hand. This has been a contested issue amidst climate activists where various questions are being raised; should gas on greenhouse be cut?
But something can be done, and this includes advanced technologies, creating energy systems and an economy that works sustainably for everyone to benefit from.

 

No:

133

Title

Catchment Resilience - We Each Hold a Piece of the Puzzle

Organizers

Cynthia Winkworth1 and Rachael Millar2
1University of Otago, New Zealand
2Environment Southland Regional Council, New Zealand
cynthia.winkworth@otago.ac.nz  
rachael.millar@es.govt.nz

Abstract

Catchment resilience is like a giant puzzle to be constructed with pieces of knowledge from a wide range of diverse players. Key for solving such puzzles is encouraging researchers to work across disciplines, share valuable work outcomes, and engage early and effectively with local communities and organisations. Yet, often for these players the first critical step towards seeking support for resilience success is identifying relevant researchers to contact to provide assistance in tackling systems problems. This think tank will explore situations where local communities, organisations and researchers have successfully come together for the common goal: supporting catchment resilience for the future. Discussions employing worldwide examples will focus on identifying key elements successfully connecting and empowering communities to drive research, ensuring meaningful knowledge transfer between partner organisations, and maintaining research independence and neutrality when considering solutions to catchment challenges. We envisage developing a resource creating local road maps for catchment resilience.

 

No:

135

Title

Resilience Building in the Community from the Impacts of Pollen Allergy

Organizers

Mehwish Noor
Fatima JInnah Women University, Pakistan
mehwish.jamil@fjwu.edu.pk

Abstract

Pollen allergy has become a tremendous health problem over the past few decades around the world. It is creating health problems like asthma, bronchitis, conjunctivitis, therefore leasing to socio economic issues. Therefore, through awareness and plantation, residents will be able to protect themselves better during the peak season. Also, the issue will be highlighted and advocated to make mitigation efforts effective
Goal/ Aim:
The proposed project aims to raise awareness and proposed mitigation impacts of pollinosis
Objectives:
i. To create awareness among the participants regarding pollinosis, its impacts, effects, symptoms and precautionary measures.
ii. To promote knowledge about native and invasive flora
iii. To help residents’ plant indoor native species which prevent indoor allergens.
iv. To come up with a way forward to mitigate or adapt to the issue of pollen allergy.

 

No:

140

Title

Genomic Invasive Toxic Species Identification under Climate Change Impact

Organizers

Monia EL Bour1 and Jamila Ben Souissi2
1INSTM, Tunisia
2National Institute of Agronomic Studies (INAT), Tunisia
monia.elbour@instm.rnrt.tn
jbensouissi@yahoo.com

Abstract

Climate change is under recent invasive alien species increase and invasion of toxic alien microbial species (by ballast and other marine pathways) is considered the main cause of marine biodiversity loss. Actually, genomic tools represent strong keys to provide quantitative and qualitative assessment of warming impacts on phenology and specific identification of microbial toxic invasive species and thus harmonization and universal up date of the genomic methods will be with relevance to provide and discuss in a large scientific consortium to set up an important database about spread and most invasive forms. Else, specific workshop about impact climate change on toxic invasion forms provide opportunities for society sensibilisation about toxic risks and large discussion on suitable adaptation skills to overcome the problem.

 

No:

147

Title

Women in Environmental Sciences and Sustainable Development Goals

Organizers

Cecilia Medupin
University of Manchester, UK
cecilia.medupin@manchester.ac.uk

Abstract

Women, most especially in deprived and international communities, feel the impact of environmental damage and pollution greatly. Women, therefore will have crucial roles to play in facing the necessary transformations to the way we live, if human beings are to survive climate change. How can women be empowered, and their voices heard in order to deliver on environmental challenges, within the framework of sustainable development goals? How can we explore partnerships between research & development organisations (local & international) to focus on women’s environmental concerns in order to deliver innovation & impact? To what extent can we encourage & inspire a new generation of women to become environmental science advocates, activists & practitioners?

 

No:

152

Title

Red-Orange Seas: Women and Ocean Sustainability

Organizers

Luciana Yokoyama Xavier and Leandra Regina Gonçalves
Oceanographic Institute of University of São Paulo AND Liga das Mulheres pelos Oceanos, Brazil
lyxavier@usp.br
leandra.goncalves@usp.br

Abstract

UN's Red-Orange colored SDG 5 calls for gender equality and female empowerment in all areas. The fundamental role of women in ocean sustainability issues is increasingly being recognized and advocated for, as seen in theme for the 2019 Ocean Day “Gender and the Ocean”. Nevertheless, there are still many aspects that must be further understood, reflected on and discussed in the promotion of gender equality in ocean science and governance. This workshop aims to amplify this discussion by inviting attendees to reflect on the most pressing issues related to women’s involvement in ocean-related activities, concerning its strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT). We invite attendees to share their viewpoints and experience in a hands-on activity to search for possibilities for collective action towards gender equality in oceans affairs.

 

No:

155

Title

Retrieve the Land or Retrieve the People? An Ecosystemic Framework for Governance and Policy

Organizers

André Francisco Pilon
University of São Paulo / International Academy of Science, Health & Ecology
gaiarine@usp.br

Abstract

An ecosystemic theoretical and practical framework for the evaluation and planning of communication, advocacy, public policies, research and teaching programmes is posited to deal with environmental problems, quality of life and the state of the world. Different dimensions of being in the world (intimate, interactive, social and biophysical), are considered, as they combine to induce the events (deficits/assets), cope with consequences (desired/undesired) and contribute for changes (potential outputs). Institutional capacity, judicial neutrality, informational transparency, social spaces for civic engagement (socio-cultural learning niches) are linked to the development of new paradigms of growth, power, wealth, work and freedom in the political, technological, economic, social, cultural and educational systems, in view of the transition to an ecosystemic model of culture, with the participation of an international network of sustainability leaders, scholars, academicians, students, youth movements, community groups, activists, policy-makers and practitioners.

 

No:

156

Title

Sustainability and Resilience of Cultural and Heritage Cities

Organizers

Mahfuzuar Rahman Barbhuiya
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur
mehfuz@iitk.ac.in

Abstract

Cultural and heritage cities are facing problems due to reasons which policy makers and planners could not think of a few decades back. With ever-increasing population and migration of people from rural to urban areas for better facilities and quality of life; cities are facing new problems every year. Poor air quality, drinking water shortage, regular floods, traffic congestions, housing shortage, power shortage and crime etc. are some of the problems faced by almost all cities around the globe. All these problems are because the cities were not designed to accomodate such huge population. United nation's sustainable development goals talks about seventeen goals; all these goals are very relevant and crucial for cultural and heritage cities. Immediate focus needs to be given to these goals else we will start losing cities and it will be very difficult to make them habitable again. In this side event we will be discussing various problems faced by the cities around the worls and we will try to find strategies and policy recommendations for the same. These recommendations will be general as well as specific and thus they can be taken up city administrators for improving quality of life.

 

No:

160

Title

Fiscal Policy Alignments for Bio energy Growth Profiling

Organizers

Dr. Jagdish P. N. Giri
GSLP Science Age and Aaditya Energy Foundation
girijpn@rediffmail.com

Abstract

In view of Paris Climate Agreement which aims to strengthen global response to the threat of climate change by keeping global temperature rise during this century well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, Bio energy Growth Profiling is aligned on two economic matrices namely Phasing Out Fossil Fuels’ Subsidies and Carbon Capture & Storage Technologies. Objectively the innovative fiscal policies are aligned to trace the major socio- economic and sustainability indicators on Bio energy investment, which together build the optimal framework of Green Transition Investment as part of policies. The proposed symposium aims to analyze Modelling of Economic Policy Incentives on these two significant base matrices (Phasing out Fossil Fuels’ Subsidies and Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies.) of Bio energy Growth Triangle with its apex at estimated bio energy supplies of 15% in global primary energy mix by 2050. The need is to derive policies that create an enabling environment and provide incentives to economic decision for policy makers, consumers, investors, autonomous public corporations, and government departments, to design pathways for effective Green Transition on Bio energy Profiling.

 

No:

161

Title

Role of Recreational Boating Media in Instigating Conversations on the Environment

Organizers

Roselle Tenefrancia
Boat Gold Coast Magazine
roselle@boatgoldcoast.com.au

Abstract

The role of what is known as “traditional media” – TV, radio, print – has been sidelined because the convenient “information at your fingertips” provides instant satisfaction. Information technology in the past two decades has really upped the ante on how society communicates and finds information. However, “traditional” media focused on niche consumers still carry weight in their respective markets. In the recreational boating scene, “traditional” media have proven effective in creating awareness on destinations around Australia, as well as focusing on the safety for the boater and for the environment affected by boating. Media provide effective ways of informing, educating and entertaining this niche market through stories and features about healthy waterways and oceans, and safe boating (promoting safety for humans and safety for nature).

 

 

 

 


 

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