Socio-Economic


No:

010

Title

Economic Value of Conservation via Human Mental Health

Organizers

Ralf Buckley
Griffith University, Australia

Abstract

Protected areas need political support, and economic valuations provide one source. Current valuations include biodiversity, ecosystem services, and tourism. The value of human mental health via recreational access is not yet included. We have calculated an approximate figure worldwide, and more detailed measures for Qld and Vic, with a parallel China program under way. It is substantially larger and politically more powerful than tourism.


 

No:

014

Title

Pharmaceutical Residues in the Marine Environment: Decisions That Must Be Taken in a Changing World

Organizers

Juan C. Durán-Álvarez
National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico

Abstract

Studies on pharmaceutical residues in the environment are performed in inland ecosystems, while little attention is given to coastal and marine environments. Throughout the world, spectacular efforts are done to determine the occurrence and distribution of a plethora of licit and illicit drugs in marine environments, the effects produced on diverse marine organisms, and some researchers work on the impacts that water warming and acidification has on such effects. This symposium is planned to unveil the current knowledge on the occurrence and effects of pharmaceutical residues in marine ecosystems, as well as to study alternatives to remove these pollutants from seawater in desalination plants. Since seawater is seen as a potential water source, new desalination systems should anticipate to remove this kind of contaminants, and the idea of this session is to produce a white paper to inform decision makers on the ubiquity of these pollutants, avoiding with this the construction of desalination plants considering just energy consumption or high rate permeate production, but also including the efficient removal of these substances.


 

No:

019

Title

Marine Ecosystem Services: From Science to Policy

Organizers

Shang Chen
First Institute of Oceanography, MNR, China

Abstract

Marine ecosystem services (MES) are the benefits that humans derive from marine ecosystems. MES science is the bridge connecting the marine ecosystems to the human welfare. To push the mainstreaming of the ecosystem service assessment into policy-making at regional, national and local scales, UNEP had established a permanent agency, i.e. IPBES, located in Bonn, Germany. IPBES’s full name is the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services. The intergovernmental North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) had formed the Working Group-Marine Ecosystem Services to promote the science of MES and its application in policy-making in the North Pacific countries. Therefore, the methodology, cases studies and application in policy-making of MES have been strongly demanded by not only the scientists but also officials around the world. This session will focus on the methodological studies of MES, sharing the cases studies of MES assessment from the coastal countries, discussing the relationship among the services, health and sustainability of marine ecosystems. The session also welcomes these studies, such as, application of MES to assess management effectiveness of marine protection (esp. marine protected areas), support of MES to the economic products and national happiness in coastal regions.


 

No:

038

Title

Nanotechnology for Circular Economy

Organizers

Achintya Bezbaruah
North Dakota State University, USA

Abstract

This symposium will bring together researchers working on circular economy and sustainability vis-à-vis nano materials. The topics to be covered will broadly include the production and applications of green/clean nanomaterials, science of reusable/recoverable nanomaterials and clean/green nanomaterials, recycling and reuse of nanomaterials, clean production of nanomaterials, nano-bio interactions, modeling and simulation of , nanomaterials, life-cycle approaches to nanomaterials, nanomaterial uses to address global grand challenges, toxicity of nanomaterials, scale up production of nanomaterials, nanomaterials for small community education, promotion of nanotechnology in schools/colleges/universities, and other topics related to sustainable nanotechnology.


 

No:

067

Title

Social Innovations for Adaptive Transitions: Learning from Climate Change Mitigation Projects in the Southern Coast of India

Organizers

K T Thomson
Cochin University of Science and Technology, India

Abstract

The social ecological systems in developing countries have been seriously affected by beach erosion due to the combined influences of developmental activities and climate change. Although the state has designed and instituted seawall, modern industries, harbors etc. as a general solution to resist beach erosion its suitability has often been challenged by local communities. Instead, they co-design adaptive transitions by proposing several new ideas and products through social innovations to mitigate climate change impacts. This workshop proposes a platform where, community members, policy makers, academicians, NGOs and design experts discuss the dynamics of social innovations for adaptive transitions by listing some interesting case studies from India and elsewhere in the light of ongoing challenges of climate change and state failures.


 

No:

073

Title

50 Green buildings - An Innovative Way of Greening Cities

Organizers

Oliver Weiss
University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Austria

Abstract

Climate change, increasing urbanization and densification in urban areas require new ways and solution approaches to enhance the quality and comfort of living in urban structures.
Although the potential for green facades within existing buildings is high, no suitable low-cost and easy to apply, holistic upgrading-solutions for public, roadside facade-greenings exist. Complex and long decision-making and permission processes within apartment buildings and public administration make the whole procedure of planning and implementation even more difficult.
Therefore, the research-project “50 green buildings” (duration 2018 to 2021) developed together with the City of Vienna an integrated combi-solution for green facades. This includes a greening-toolkit and an innovative web-based instrument for participation. The low-tech, low-cost, easy implementable greening-toolkit includes troughs, technical soils, trellis and plants as well as a maintenance concept, that is specifically applicable to existing buildings.
The innovation of the greening-toolkit is tested within a co-creation-process of the research-project “50 green buildings” in Vienna. Social and (vegetation-)technical effects of green facades will be monitored. This helps to get accurate data for decision-makers, building developers, planners and building owners. The greening-toolkit will be monitored using vegetation-technical parameters like physiological stress detection of plants, vitality, degree of coverage, ...
Based on the findings of this research-project, a business model will be developed that helps to multiply “50 green buildings” to other areas of Vienna or cities all around the world.
The City of Vienna already appreciates these efforts and increased the numbers of government-funded green facades modules from 50 up to 150 green buildings.


 

No:

078

Title

Forests and the Conservation Economy: Integrated and Participatory Approaches to Forest Protection for a Sustainable and Desirable Future

Organizers

Edward Morgan
Griffith University, Australia

Abstract

Forests provide a range of unique and high-quality ecosystem services and benefits that are vital for a sustainable and desirable future. At the same time, forest landscapes are home to communities who are managers and protectors of the forest. These communities face development and population pressures that encourage the extractive and unsustainable use of the forest. The conservation economy is an alternative paradigm that recognises and harnesses the ‘basket of benefits’ of forests to create alternative sustainable development pathways for communities. Creating a conservation economy requires novel and integrated approaches to ecology, geography, economics, policy, governance and planning. This session welcomes contributions from academics, government and NGOs that are interested in integrated approach to forest ecosystem science, alternative economic evaluations, novel policy approaches, transformative governance or participatory planning processes that support the creation of a conservation economy for a more desirable future.


 

No:

080

Title

Building a Sustainable and Desirable Future: The Need for a Biophysical Perspective

Organizers

Pier Paolo Franzese
Parthenope University of Naples, Italy

Abstract

The collection of papers in this symposium will explore the biophysical basis supporting human economy and well-being. A wider perspective suggesting the economic system as a subsystem of the larger more encompassing geobiosphere is needed. The theory of neoclassical economics based on unlimited growth is unlikely to provide a sustainable future for humankind. Governments commonly evaluate the performance of national economies through macroeconomic indicators such as the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). However, conventional monetary accounting systems often fail to reflect the consequences of anthropogenic impacts on national wealth and human well-being. For this reason, it is necessary to develop and apply environmental accounting systems capable of recognizing and valuing the life support system provided by natural ecosystems to human economy.


 

No:

091

Title

Climate Change Impacts to Ecosystem Services and Potential Management Responses

Organizers

Janet A. Cushing
National Climate Adaptation Science Center, US Geological Survey, USA

Abstract

Climate change is already affecting and will continue to impact the supply and demand of ecosystem goods and services (EGS) that are important for human well-being. Understanding these impacts is important for policymakers and managers interested in maintaining key services, and research on the topic has grown in recent years. Climate impacts to EGS are context and service specific, and local and regional assessments of impacts are needed to get a full picture of potential responses.
In this symposium, we highlight recent research focused on climate impacts to specific EGS and potential management options. The initial presentation will set the context by providing an overview of studies that have focused on climate change effects on the supply and demand of EGS. Following this, presenters will cover a range of geographically vulnerable areas, service types, and potential responses. Each presenter will give an overview of the EGS studied, discuss methods for assessing climate change impacts, and will discuss management implications of the projected impacts. Presentation examples include coastal management approaches to support the integration of ecological and human community planning for climate change, the impact of climate change on Native American cultural services, integrating ecosystem services and drought vulnerability assessments, and valuation of climate change impacts on EGS provided by coral reefs.
Presentations and posters from other government agencies, universities, and natural and cultural resource managers focused on climate impacts to EGS are welcome. Talks will be followed by a panel discussion with an opportunity for questions from the audience.


 

No:

103

Title

Techno-Socio-Economics of Energy Efficiency

Organizers

Athar Kamal, Sami G. Al Ghamdi and Muammer Koc
Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Qatar

Abstract

The constant expansion of buildings, transportation and industry play a significant role in the ever-changing landscape of the urban environment. These developments occur as a result of the increasing ‘expected standards of living’ as well as the growing economic power of the population. However, such progress often leads to overcrowded cities, contaminated air and water-ways, uncontrollable garbage and waste disposal, as well as growing health concerns and problems.
A large chunk of policy that tries to address these problems revolves around the efficient production and usage of services and products, without reducing the ‘expected standards of living’. Nevertheless, the policies made to address such problems are not efficient in themselves. While the latest technological innovation can reduce energy consumption manifolds, their costs as well as social acceptance can hinder the progress towards a sustainable and desirable future. There is a delay of years, if not decades for acceptance of such technologies and policies, and by the time these are affordable and sustainable to the masses, newer technology could already overcome the drawbacks of the now ‘old and defunct’ products and services. And here lies a three-dimensional dilemma that scientist, policy makers, and general public face; Should they fund research to look for the next technological breakthroughs, spend money to educate the masses or should they subsidize (give economic incentives) current technologies which are likely to be obsolete within a couple of years. To address these problems, this symposium calls for the submission of abstracts and papers to address this threefold problem.


 

No:

104

Title

Developing Future Scenarios for Socio-Ecological Models

Organizers

Alistair Hobday and Ingrid van Putten
CSIRO, Australia

Abstract

Global scale projections of marine ecosystems for the 21st century mostly consider the impacts of climate change-related drivers (e.g. ocean acidification, warming, deoxygenation, ocean circulation changes). Other anthropogenic drivers that influence the state of the ocean (e.g. pollution and other human activities) are poorly represented and are not currently included as defined scenarios for incorporation in models (similar to the Representative Concentration Pathways adopted by the International Panel for Climate Change). To better assess the potential evolution of ocean systems, there is an urgent need for developing policy-relevant scenarios that include all dimensions of human influence on ocean systems. An alternative is to integrate an explicit representation of human activities and their drivers in oceanic socio-ecological models. We seek contributed presentations addressing the development of scenarios or describing modelling approaches that include scenarios.


 

No:

105

Title

Transformative Change from EvalIndigenous: Global perspectives by Indigenous Evaluation Practices

Organizers

Yakeu Djiam
EvalIndigenous Network

Abstract

This session aims to present the international roles play by indigenous evaluators in line with the 2030 SDGs’ agenda under a strong commitment of “Leaving no one behind” and “reaching the furthest behind first”. The session will highlight key achievements of EvalIndigenous as well as emerging challenges and perspectives. EvalIndigenous will share stories from the global “Native Voices” evaluation project, resources from the February 2019 inaugural global EvalIndigenous conference in New Zealand and will give updates to current and future activities of EvalIndigenous. Through interactive discussion and diverse Indigenous perspective storytelling, the international presenters will also share emerging social, economic and political indicators of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and application to UNDRIP and other national/regional VOPE or community initiatives.


 

No:

107

Title

Sustainable Financing for Sustainable Development

Organizers

Ibrahim Ari and Muammer Koç
Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Qatar

Abstract

Public infrastructure plays a profound role in ensuring and sustaining the welfare of nations by satisfying the United Nation’s sustainable development goals for a better planet. Public infrastructure includes many tangible and intangible assets for a sustainable future such as energy, water, food, transportation, health, and education. However, there is a substantial gap in financing sustainable development. This problem leads governments and private entities to borrow a considerable amount of money for sustainable development, although such excessive debt-based financing pushes them through unsustainable debt zone and into unsustainable economic growth. This fact shows that finding the required capital is one of the greatest challenges for sustainability faced by governments and private entities. To contribute to the solutions for such challenges, this symposium will enhance the horizon of participants in finding alternative financing models.


 

No:

115

Title

Eco-positive Design and Development

Organizers

Janis Birkeland1 and Delwyn Jones2
1University of Melbourne, Australia
2The Evah Institute, Australia

Abstract

Buildings and their supply chains are a huge factor in ecological destruction over their lifecycles. The greenest buildings are still harmful at the sites of resource extraction, manufacturing and construction. Green building rating tools only compare building proposals to conventional unsustainable buildings. In terms of biodiversity, these tools largely only consider post-construction remedial landscaping strategies. Net-positive design has been resisted by the industry, partly because ecosystems are difficult to translate into simplistic building rules. A new (free) computer app will be demonstrated at the symposium. It reverses past approaches to show how buildings, despite their systemic negative impacts, could provide net-positive gains to the natural environment. This is also explained in a book, Net-positive Design and Development, now in press, that will be available well before the conference.


 

No:

116

Title

Dynamic Ocean Management: Disrupting the Static Management Paradigm to Support Sustainable Use of Marine Resources

Organizers

Kylie Scales1 and Briana Abrahms2
1University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia
2NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Environmental Research Division, USA

Abstract

The global ocean is a vast, dynamic environment, in which physical conditions and habitats can change over short timescales. Standard approaches to managing human activities in changing seascapes are based upon measures that are static in space and time, such as Marine Protected Areas or fisheries closures. In contrast, dynamic approaches can better match the timescales of ecological processes and human activities, thereby increasing the efficiency of management strategies. To support dynamic management, the increasing availability of ocean observation data and local- to global-scale climate models allows assessment of near-real time and future physical conditions at ever greater resolutions. Coupled with a growing understanding of biological responses to physical variability, these advancements provide unprecedented opportunity to disrupt this static management paradigm. Nowcasting species distributions can allow for marine management to become as fluid as the ocean itself.
This symposium will bring together speakers leading the development of dynamic approaches to managing the exploitation of marine resources and mitigating impacts on marine biodiversity. We will present international case studies describing the design, development and implementation of tools supporting dynamic ocean management, and provide opportunity for discussion regarding lessons learned and potential future applications.


 

No:

119

Title

Urban Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning: Sustaining Human Habitation

Organizers

Jennifer Adams Krumins1 and Myla Aronson2
1Montclair State University, USA
2Rutgers University, USA

Abstract

Globally, as human habitation moves increasingly into cities, the capacity to sustainably maintain healthy and functional urban ecosystems also becomes increasingly important. The foundation for ecosystem function is grounded in a biodiverse community across all taxonomic levels. The degree to which taxonomic versus functional diversity determines ecosystem functioning is a recent and compelling topic of research. In this symposium, we have gathered a liaison of ecologist who all hold expertise in urban ecosystems, specifically diversity and functioning. In addition, we also would like to promote the role of outreach and education with the understanding that only through education will the value of urban biodiversity be promoted.


 

No:

139

Title

Ecosystem Services of Atlantic Forests: Planning and Management

Organizers

Ignacio J. Diaz-Maroto
University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain

Abstract

Today the ecosystems services provided for Atlantic forests are one of the main reasons for their planning and management. These ecosystems are recognized as interest community habitat, so its conservation is fundamental. The ecosystem services are very different, and they have related with the healthy and leisure activities: i) water and air quality, ii) erosion and protection of nature phenomenon, iii) life nature, and iv) rural development.


 

No:

144

Title

Sustainability and What Really Matters

Organizers

Gabriela Sabau
Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada

Abstract

Consensus is building on the fact that modern economies are unsustainable both by destroying the environment (Heal, 2016) and by building inequality (Piketty, 2013). A plausible cause is the foggy notion of value in economics, which creates confusion between value creation and value extraction, between rents and profits (Mazzucato, 2018), and maintains the illusion that humanity can continue exceeding with impunity the objective planetary boundaries (Steffen et al. 2015).
A session on sustainability and values clarification could bring valuable insights on how to promote sustainability. Possible topics: what is value, what values underline sustainability thinking and action, are biotic resources more valuable than abiotic resources, how to reach a normative consensus that sustainability is a public value, how to nurture sustainability values, the role of government in sustainable public policies and in governing public value, can markets be shaped by sustainability principles, etc.


 

No:

148

Title

Innovations for Sustainable Agriculture

Organizers

Lisa Norton
Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, UK

Abstract

Farmers are innovating novel agro-ecological practices to ensure their long-term sustainability, improve the food they produce and the land that they produce it from. They are also innovating co-operative approaches to everything from cross-continent to local knowledge transfer in order that they can learn from one another.
Such forms of innovation may be the kinds of innovation that we need in agriculture to transform current destructive practices and maintain the capacity of land to continue to produce for future generations.
This session will explore the potential for transformational agriculture to come from within the industry and discuss the roles of science and effective knowledge transfer.
The work will draw on the EU FAB farmers project and numerous national projects.


 

No:

151

Title

Environmental Planning and Anticipatory Governance in a Climate Emergency Context

Organizers

Pedro Torres
University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB), USA

Abstract

Responses to the contemporary emergency climate collapse requires new paradigms not just based on past experience, but new approaches for environmental policy and frameworks seeking a broad and interdisciplinary research that includes, civil society, traditional communities, technicians and decision makers. Breaking traditional practices of planning and governing our natural resources is a critical step in this process. A new governance arrangements and shared responsibilities are imperative. But how to “get off the ground” policies and projects that operate in the area of ​​uncertainty? A first movement is to overcome these challenges is to recognize that this is no longer a problem to come but from the present. The present symposium aims to contribute to this debate in a science-policy interface, open possibilities from a diversity fields of knowledge, approaches and theories that address innovation forms of planning, policy and governance for a sustainable and desire future in a climate emergency context.

 

No:

159

Title

Approaches to Characterize and Counter the Plastic Pollution Crisis, from Macro to Micro and Source to Sink

Organizers

Andrew Bruce Gray
University of California, Riverside

Abstract

The global production of plastic and its flux to environmental systems as mismanaged waste has increased exponentially since the mid-20th century. During this time the environmental and economic damage of macroplastic pollution (size > 5 mm size) has been well documented, particularly in aquatic systems. Recently concerns over the environmental ramifications of microplastic particles (size < 5 mm) have increased as microplastics have been found in every environmental sphere. This plastic pollution crisis has caused a growing wave of interest from government agencies, academic institutions, and society. Despite this interest, many fundamental questions regarding the fate and transport of plastic pollution, the size and composition specific toxicity of plastic particles, and the environmental and human health risks posed by plastics, remain unanswered. In this session we will tackle each aspect of the plastic pollution supply, transport and fate cascade through watershed, coastal and marine systems, and also address ecotoxicological and human health impacts potentially posed by macro- and microplastic pollution. Finally, we recognize that solving the problem of increasing plastic waste production and its mismanagement requires interdisciplinary cooperation between social, physical and biological sciences, working actively with environmental management agencies, dischargers and the general public. We invite contributions that focus on (but are not limited to): monitoring and modeling approaches to characterizing the transport and fate of plastic pollution, reactive transport, degradation, and contaminant association processes of plastics in the environment, plastic ecotoxicology and human health investigations, and integrated approaches to countering the plastic pollution crisis.

 


 

 

 

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