Policies and Governance/Science and Policy


 

No:

005

Title

Sustainability and Resilience

Organizers

Visala Tallavarjula
University of California, Santa Barbara, USA

Abstract

By 2050, the global population will exceed 9 billion, and food production has to meet the demand. Irrigation consumes 80% of freshwater. Climate change is decreasing available fresh water and arable land due to desertification. This project addresses water stress through irrigation efficiency improvement and desertification through cultivation in sandy soils of deserts. The insert delivers water to the plant root zone, suppressing evaporation loss. Percolation-Control is achieved using the 33% charcoal amended soil Percolation-Control-Layer (PCL) at the root zone. The growth of radish and kale plants in sand with PCL, is more than doubled in leaf size and plant weight compared with those grown in sand alone. Sub-surface charcoal amendment achieves c-sequestration and helps to mitigate climate change.


 

No:

009

Title

Strategies to ‘Decouple’ Crop Productivity and Carbon Footprint in Agroecosystem

Organizers

Yantai Gan
Federal Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Canada

Abstract

A major challenge of our time is to produce sufficient nutrient-rich food to meet the need of the ever-growing human population on the planet. Since ‘green revolution’, high inputs (i.e. synthetic fertilizers and pesticides) have been used to increase crop yields, but excessive use of chemicals has caused land degradation, increased greenhouse gas footprint with significant risks for eutrophication. Many studies conducted across various ecoregions have shown that an integrated system approach can be adopted to achieve effective ‘decoupling’ of increasing crop yield and carbon footprint. This may include (but not limited to): (i) intensifying crop rotations to enhance carbon conversion from atmospheric CO2 to plant biomass; (ii) including N2-fixing pulse crops in rotations to reduce synthetic fertilizer use; (iii) improving fertilizer-N use efficiency to lower N2O emissions; and (iv) sequestering more carbon to the soil to offset CO2 emissions from cropping inputs. The proposed session is to share expertise, exchange latest findings on the subject, and discuss possible across-globe research project(s) to tackle the global issue – increasing land productivity (crop yield) without increasing environmental footprint in agroecosystem.


 

No:

016

Title

Is Regional Ocean Governance the ‘Missing Link’ to Achieve Global Sustainability?

Organizers

Lucia Fanning1 and Robin Mahon2
1Dalhousie University, Canada
2University of the West Indies, Jamaica

Abstract

The importance of regional and subregional levels in global ocean governance is being increasingly recognized as countries struggle to meet targets for ocean sustainability. This raises the question of whether there is an overall multi-level governance structure that should be pursued to strengthen ocean governance as envisaged in the Sustainable Development Goals Building on work identifying 20 polycentric regional clusters within the global ocean, this symposium focuses on six of these clusters with a mix of developing and tropical/subtropical regions (Pacific islands, Western Central Atlantic, Southeast Atlantic, Western Indian Ocean, Southeast Asia and the Mediterranean). We will explore the question of whether polycentric regional clusters provide the ‘missing link’ for achieving global ocean governance objectives.


 

No:

020

Title

Analysis and Modelling Social-Ecological Systems for Sustainable Development: Challenges and Opportunities

Organizers

Md Sarwar Hossain1, Md Nurul Amin2, Sylvia Szabo3, Lisa Lobry de Bruyn2, Chinwe Ifejika Speranza1
1Institute of Geography, University of Bern, Switzerland
2School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Australia
3Department of Development and Sustainability, Asian Institute of Technology, Thailand

Abstract

Understanding human-nature interactions is a prerequisite for sustainable development, and for adapting to changing land- and seascapes, and for working towards a desirable future. Sustainability requires a critical analysis of both social and ecological components and exploring their dynamics (feedbacks, nonlinearity) across multiple scales. Failure to recognize such complex dynamics has led to unsustainable development pathways, accompanied by environmental and social challenges, such as climate change, biodiversity loss, resource degradation, unsustainable livelihoods and equity. Despite the recognised significance of SES, progress in the operationalization of complex dynamics (including cross-scale dynamics) of a SES through innovative tools and methods remains slow, especially for a desirable SES trajectory.
In this session, our main objective is to discuss contributions dealing with the opportunities and challenges in analysing and modelling SES. The session is expected to include, but not necessarily be limited to, the following topics:
• Long-term trends and transitions in interactions between SES
• Conceptualization and operationalization of SES concept for advancing sustainable development agendas (e.g. SDGs)
• Modelling SES dynamics for sustainable development, e.g. safe and just operating space, tipping points.
• Sustainable management of land, water, and agricultural systems, as well as sustainable livelihoods and wellbeing.
• Challenges (e.g. data availability) and opportunities of using SES analysis for SDGs
We welcome contributions addressing these points.


 

No:

031

Title

Nature-Based Solutions Against Hydrometeorological Hazards

Organizers

Alejandro Gonzalez Ollauri
Glasgow Caledonian University, UK

Abstract

Hydrometeorological hazards are caused by extreme meteorological and climate events, causing serious damages to natural and urban ecosystems. Examples of hydrometeorological hazards are landslides, erosion, floods, draught, or storm surges. The intensification of the hydrological cycle due to climate change will increase the virulence of hydro-meteorological hazards globally. Nature-based solutions (NBS) -i.e. actions that use nature to tackling socio-environmental issues - may contribute to mitigate hydrometeorological hazards while providing bundles of ecosystem services, making human communities more resilient towards climate change. However, the implementation, operationalisation, and performance of NBS on hazard-prone zones requires urgent investigation. This multi-disciplinary Session aims at collecting a series of original, high-quality presentations illustrating examples on how NBS can be deployed against different hydrometeorological hazards through the use of stakeholder engagement strategies and approaches.


 

No:

035

Title

Bridging the Gap Between Climate Adaptation Planning and Cultural Heritage Management

Organizers

Sandra Fatoric
Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands

Abstract

- Climate change vulnerabilities or risks assessments of diverse cultural heritage types (e.g., historic buildings, archeological sites, intangible heritage)
- Examples of implemented climate adaptation solutions for protecting cultural heritage
- Cultural heritage as an example of climate resilience
- Climate adaptation policies
- Cultural heritage benefits and opportunities for informing climate adaptation
- Barriers and limits to climate adaptation of cultural heritage
- Decision-making process for adapting or "letting go" diverse types of cultural heritage at risk from changing climate


 

No:

041

Title

Drought and Salt Stress, a Challenge for Sub-Sahara Africa Food Security

Organizers

Njimona Ibrahim
Bamenda University of Science and Technology, Cameroon

Abstract

Agriculture involve the production of high-quality food crops under less favourable conditions. These environmental constraints are in particular drought and salt stresses. Drought often goes along with high temperatures that reduce yield. In Africa these stresses are limiting factors for crop production. In Cameroon for example, the key agricultural problems resulting in poor agricultural output are a) decreased soil fertility due to the cultivation of one cultivar for too many generations, b) gradual changes in environmental conditions c) net-increase in environmental temperature, d) poverty and lack of information. Beside reduced growth, these factors increase overall plant susceptibility to other stress factors, i.e. biotic stress. Also, there is strong competition between food crops and energy crops. This is already seen in Europe which can possibly extend to Africa soon. We believe that it is of interest to have better strategies for a better food crop production especially as we need to produce more and more food for the growing population. Methods in agriculture in Africa are less well developed there is definitely a need to brainstorm in this direction. Novel approaches could increase the output despite environmental constraints. The overall challenges which this workshop will brain storm on are (a) to develop methods that improve yields under unfavourable conditions and to identify new promising molecular targets, i.e. for breeders. A further challenge is to provide sustainable methods, such as organic fertilizer since the use of chemically synthesised fertiliser will probably result in ground water pollution.


 

No:

046

Title

From Hilltops to Oceans – The Role of Coastal Habitats for Ecosystem Resilience to Anthropogenic Change

Organizers

Jenny Hillman
University of Auckland, New Zealand

Abstract

Human land use is increasing nutrient, organic matter and sediment loads to waterways, with implications for the health and functioning of coastal ecosystems. Key habitats within these ecosystems are hotspots for transformation of nutrients and organic matter at the land-ocean interface. Conserving and restoring such habitats, and the links between them, allow mitigation of the impacts of increasing inputs, as well as future anthropogenic stressors and environmental shifts associated with climate change. Here we look to identify key coastal habitats and assess the capacity of these habitats to mitigate change through ecosystem functions such as denitrification and carbon sequestration. This symposium will feature collaborative research that draws attention to the importance of enhancing healthy coastal habitats and ecosystem functions to solve environmental problems.


 

No:

052

Title

Green Consumerism: Determinants and Policies

Organizers

Aldo Alvarez-Risco
Universidad de San Martin de Porres, Peru

Abstract

The Green consumerism has extended speedily in developed markets, and it is emerging in developing nations. Many theories try to explain how and why a consumer or shopper buy with some specific habits or determinants. Last years, the importance of consumption has become highlighted primarily based on the quality of the environment and the sustainable development processes. In a few words, environmentally responsible purchasing is vital as unintentional purchasing of goods can severely harm the environment (Joshi & Rahman, 2015). The last decade, many authors have studied different consumer green purchase behavior and identified several factors which influence the green shopper's decisions.
We must coordinate to create new and coherent policies. This session will discuss different strategies for promote circular economy in different societies following same green outcomes based in real situations.


 

No:

053

Title

Big Data Guided Design Science Information System Development for Sustainability Manifested Management and Accounting

Organizers

Shastri Nimmagadda
Curtin University, Australia

Abstract

Among geographically distributed human and environment ecosystems, multifaceted and composite data relationships exist within a fused sustainability entity. Human ecosystems endure as long as symbiotic conditions exist within a persisting environment ecosystem. In the current research, the authors describe an ecosystem as a communion of elements and processes and their chains, with volumes of conceptualised and contextualised events, in a spatial domain where they frequently interact and communicate through digital media. The ecosystem in such Big Data contexts can be manifested as a holistic information system, a Design Science Information System (DSIS), an interrogable and interpretable sustainability framework.
The DSIS driven depositories have the opportunity and scope of unifying ecosystems that can deliver ecosystem services to a variety of communities. The robust DSIS approach is likely to facilitate the strategic development of sustainability problem solutions, their benchmarks and impacts to provide good quality ecosystem services at micro, meso and macro levels in spatial and temporal dimensions. The integration of data across diverse domains can significantly minimise the ambiguity of information needed in the unification of knowledge, interpretable among different ecosystems. The DSIS driven registry or an inventory of the ecosystem assets and resources is analysed to forecast, and provide quality information to the managers and policy makers of the ecosystem providers. DSIS is a demonstration of a digital replication of sustainability manifested management and accounting registry, which is not only for reporting but for decision support systems to provide economically and environmentally sustainable ecosystem services to needy ecological communities.


 

No:

057

Title

A Model for Sustainable Coastal Landscapes: Policies, Programs and Strategies from the University of Florida, Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ Program

Organizers

Esengul Momol
University of Florida, USA

Abstract

This symposium proposes to highlight sustainable landscaping practices in Florida, where outdoor water use can consume up to 74 percent of the total household water budget. With 13,500 kilometers of coastline and 14.5 million of its 21-million-person population living in coastal counties, Florida faces significant challenges in watershed and coastal resource protection. Nutrients, including those directly linked to residential fertilizer use, are driving widespread riverine and estuarine algal blooms that are increasing in both frequency and duration. Further, Florida’s population is projected to grow an additional 25 percent in the next 20 years. Consequently, the state of Florida has enacted a statewide water conservation and protection program called Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ (FFL). The program promotes sustainable landscape design and maintenance practices that are documented with preventing more than 30,000 kg of nitrogen per year from entering Florida waters. Symposium speakers will overview the FFL program and expand on its core principles including the use of sustainable landscape design principles, smart technology irrigation systems, proper fertilization practices, and integrated pest management. Speakers will also discuss additional FFL programs including the state mandated Green Industries Best Management Practices (GI-BMP) program that, since 2006, has trained over 55,000 landscapers statewide in fertilizer and landscape BMP’s. Finally, speakers will discuss FFL program activities such as the FFL mobile web applications that target specific audiences; case studies that highlight program successes; and recent research projects on sustainable landscape design and strategies to overcome behavioral constraints that hinder residents from adopting sustainable landscaping practices in their yards.


 

No:

060

Title

Warming Earth: Measuring and Modeling GHG Fluxes from Agricultural Ecosystems

Organizers

Saseendran S. Anapalli
Sustainable Water Management Research Unit, USDA ARS, USA

Abstract

Global warming associated with anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is threatening the existence of life on earth. Average surface atmospheric temperature already went up by about 0.6 oC in the last 100 yrs. Climate model (GCM) projections show potential for a 3 to 5 oC rise in global temperatures in the 21st century under business as usual emission scenario. The most abundant greenhouse gas emitted by fossil fuels, CO2, is also the sole substrate in photosynthesis and biomass growth in plants. Submerged rice fields produce another greenhouse gas with higher warming potential, methane (CH4). Water vapor, though not counted as a GHG, is emitted by cropping systems through evapotranspiration. Contextually, quantification of CO2, water, and CH4 dynamics in cropping systems is critical in adapting both agricultural production and water and other natural resources to control GHG emissions. Measurements and modeling their fluxes at crop-ecosystem scales will be discussed in the presentations. In the last few years, I embarked on a large-scale, long-term measurement of fluxes of these GHGs from corn, soybean, cotton, and rice in a humid climate in the USA, using eddy covariance and energy balance flux towers and methods. Potential speakers will present their studies and experiences in this important research area.


 

No:

068

Title

Sustainable and Resilient Cities

Organizers

Mahfuzuar Rahman Barbhuiya
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, India

Abstract

Cities around the world are not able to sustain themselves because of growing population, carbon emission, lack of governmental support and vision etc. The lack of proper planning and overuse of resources is leading to the deterioration of natural habitats. This is a classic example of the “tragedy of commons” (Hardin, 1968).
Also, cities are not prepared to face natural and man-made disasters. In the backdrop of the recent disasters and the possibility of such events occurring more frequently in the wake of climate change, studying the idea of the resilience of a city is the need of the hour. Resilience has been defined as “the ability of the system to withstand a major disruption within acceptable degradation parameters and to recover within an acceptable time and composite costs and risks” (Haimes, 2009).
The objective is to understand the extant literature in terms of the theories of city sustainability and resilience, the theories related to sustainability and resilience in different kinds of systems, and the more specific literature related to factors that affect resilience of different cities in different geographic locations. Indicators for resilience and sustainability will be identified indicators for social resilience and sustainability, economic resilience and sustainability, institutional resilience and sustainability, infrastructural resilience and sustainability and community capital. The role of different stakeholders in resilience and sustainability will be studied.
Haimes, Y. Y. (2009). On the definition of resilience in systems. Risk Analysis: An International Journal, 29(4).
Hardin, G. (1968). The tragedy of the commons. Science, 162 (3859).


 

No:

082

Title

Local Cultures and Traditional Knowledge in Future Ocean Governance

Organizers

Sebastian Thomas
University of Melbourne, Australia

Abstract

Ocean governance is a complex and challenging topic that demands integrative and transdisciplinary approaches, particularly in a time of unprecedented global environmental change. To sustain healthy, productive marine and coastal ecosystems and thriving ocean-dependent communities in the future will require governance frameworks that support human well-being, ecosystem health, and social-ecological resilience. There are many theoretical and practical approaches to ocean and coastal governance including ecosystem-based management, marine spatial planning, and participatory or co-management, among others. However, the role of local knowledge and traditional culture is not always prominent in these systems. Given the vulnerability of many traditional coastal and ocean-dependent communities, there is reason to consider how traditional culture and local knowledge might inform governance approaches. Existing examples of such initiatives include Locally Managed Marine Areas (LMMAs) in the Pacific and Australia’s Traditional Use of Marine Resource Agreements (TUMRAs).
This thematic track will explore how culture, traditional knowledge, and Indigenous perspectives might inform, benefit from, or conflict with future approaches to marine and coastal governance. Abstracts representing diverse disciplinary perspectives are welcome, and interdisciplinary research is strongly encouraged. Themes and questions include how local culture can support social-ecological health, the potential for traditional practices to contribute to Sustainable Development Goals, and examples of initiatives that demonstrate success, challenge, conflict, or innovation. The symposium seeks theoretical, empirical, or methodological insights to inform future ocean governance supporting cultural sustainability, traditional knowledge, and Indigenous self-determination. Accepted papers will be presented with a discussion forum to develop a synthesis article or special issue.


 

No:

097

Title

Network Models Inform Interdisciplinary Research in Sustainability and Resilience

Organizers

Brian D. Fath
Towson University, USA

Abstract

This symposium welcomes contributions using network methodologies to investigate sustainability and resilience in ecological, social, and socio-ecological systems. The analysis techniques, particularly those developed in the ecological network analysis literature, have recently had great saliency in exploring and understanding the indirect and holistic connections, and internal system processes, in a wide range of applications. Specifically, the approach is useful for transferring nature-based ecosystem performance and sustainability indicators to improve system resilience and performance of socio-ecological and economic systems. This session is open to research papers at this interdisciplinary interface of network methods, theoretical and applied network-based research into sustainability and resilience, and environmental management.


 

No:

101

Title

Climate Resilience in Arid Regions

Organizers

Aliakbar Shamsipour
University of Tehran, Iran

Abstract

The characteristics of the climate and its intermittent changes are one of the most important environmental factors affecting the management and planning of the development of human societies. Arid regions are often at risk due to the high variability in climatic elements and phenomena. Arid areas are naturally hot and dry, the occurrence and increase of the intensity and frequency of heat waves in different months, especially in warm months of the year, increasing the environment's water requirement, using more energy for cooling and increasing the per capita consumption of water for health. Returning to our ancestral knowledge and updating them is the key to solving the problem in order to adaptability to environmental conditions and reduce the effects of heat waves. Central courtyard houses have been the old architectural art of the arid lands like Iran. In addition to being safe from hot air, turning exterior hot air into an opportunity to cool the interior spaces of the buildings. So that the Yazd and Kashan wind catchers as a traditional Iranian architectural element to create natural ventilation in buildings, todays is used for cooling large sports stadiums in some countries such as the USA and for outer spaces and neighborhoods in Dubai. Optimizing the use of wind catchers' techniques is a way to reducing dependence to fossil fuels resources, renewable energy and developing renewable energies in order to coordinate and collaborate with local communities and reducing greenhouse gases.


 

No:

102

Title

Water Sustainability

Organizers

Nurettin Sezer
Qatar Foundation - Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Qatar

Abstract

The improper management of and insufficient access to the freshwater resources have caused a broad range of ecological and human crises. Extinction of species due to the destruction of aquatic systems, millions of deaths due to the water-related illnesses, and the regional and international conflicts over scarce and shared water resources are examples to these crises. With the current population growth, it is foreseen that these problems will be more severe in the future. Consequently, new approaches for sustainable water supply by incorporating the sustainability and equity principles are essential in solving the growing water crises.


 

No:

118

Title

Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) under Uncertainty: Connecting Sustainability Knowledge and Action at the Local Level

Organizers

Enayat A. Moallemi and Brett A. Bryan
Deakin University, Australia

Abstract

The universally accepted UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the 17 SDGs are a key part of the widely recognised transformational change that nations need to adopt to achieve sustainability. Despite the past successful efforts, challenges persist in implementing this global framework locally and in creating impacts on the ground. A highly nuanced investigation of local conditions and capacities with communities and stakeholders along with the need to develop robust pathways will demand a plurality of bespoke qualitative and quantitative methods and approaches in local implementation of SDGs.
We aim to contribute to the sustainability science by effectively harnessing models and participatory processes to provide scientific advice on drawing robust pathways towards local SDGs under global change from the bottom-up and on shaping implementable actions with stakeholder participation. By doing so, we intend to enhance the science-policy interface by transcending the boundary between knowledge systems (where scientists operate) and the realm of action (where policymakers sit) in the sustainability science.
We have a strong base for arguing for the important role of bottom-up actions for achieving the SDGs, and that our symposium will initiate a timely discussion within the global sustainability community. We are currently leading a large, philanthropy-funded project aimed at downscaling SDGs in local communities in Australia. The project will develop new combined participatory and modelling techniques for engaging local communities in developing shared pathways to achieve local sustainability targets.


 

No:

132

Title

Unleashing Leadership for a Sustainable Future: A Gender Lens Perspective

Organizers

Isabel B. Franco
United Nations University - Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability, Japan

Abstract

Global transformations present, both, limitations and opportunities for sustainability leadership and career growth particularly for women. By identifying these existing barriers and addressing necessary actions to be taken, research findings show that success in this area largely depends on the collaboration of multiple stakeholders, that is, governments, corporations, higher education institutions and civil society organizations. This presentation will provide a qualitative assessment of current leadership actions and opportunities in order to build knowledge and understanding of the limiting factors and barriers that prevent women from embarking on a leadership pathway in sustainability-related careers. These limiting factors are grouped into three categories namely: socio-cultural, corporate and governance factors. Some specific challenges identified by participants, include maternal, family, cultural conceptions of gender roles and norms, as well as, work place diversity. These variables all contribute to a gender and culturally normative ecosystem that present competitive barriers for career development for women in sustainability.


 

No:

145

Title

Stakeholder Engagement for Natural Disaster Preparation: Building Community Resilience

Organizers

Deborah Shmueli1 and Connie Ozawa2
1University of Haifa, Israel
2Portland State University, USA

Abstract

This symposium aims to explore international experience with stakeholder engagement and participation mechanisms with regard to the preparation stage for large-scale natural disasters, with a focus on local communities. The research distinguishes between two types of ‘publics’: a) the general populous, and b) stakeholders and planners.
In recent years, disaster planners have shifted the focus of disaster preparation to building resilient communities (Cutter et al, 2008; O’Brien et al, 2010; Britton and Clark, 2000). Current research and practice find that stakeholders in resilient communities are better able to withstand and respond to adversity, creating communities which are better prepared to encounter natural hazards (Steward et al, 2009). Therefore, the theoretical starting point for this research is resilience, with the basic assumptions being: • Local and national resilience depends on (1) effective preparedness, and (2) a strong, caring and connected community; and • Engagement processes can advance the creation of both preparedness and strong communities, thus they are important tools for achieving resilience.

 

No:

153

Title

Modelling Socio-Ecological Systems using Integrated Participatory Approach

Organizers

Russell Richards
University of Queensland

Abstract

The proposed session will focus on modelling socio-ecological systems using principles of systems thinking, system dynamics and other integrative modelling approaches. In particular, we are interested in research where models have been developed and used for socio-ecological systems that integrate key drivers, processes and responses that interact within, and have feedback on, the system that is being investigated. Often, these models typically require the combination of knowledge and data from a variety of sources, including the participation and collaboration of researchers from diverse domains, decision-makers and (other) stakeholders.

 


 

 

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