Ecology and Biodiversity


 

No:

018

Title

New Approaches of Water Resources Monitoring, Evaluation, Conservation and Restauration

Organizers

Alina Barbulescu
Ovidius University of Constanta Romania and Technical University of Civil Engineering, Romania

Abstract

Water pollution is one of the most important issues for all the nations, due to its impact on the human life and economic activity. Thus, maintaining the water quality for the present and future generations must be a priority for all the people and the decision factors, as well.
We expect that the research presented in this special session will answer the following questions: How to better monitor the water quality? Are the present indicators of water quality good enough to emphasize the water quality or could they be improved and how? Which measures can be proposed based on some given indicators, to improve the water quality? Which green methods could be used for cleaning the water? Articles presenting new mathematical techniques for modeling and prediction the water resources evolution and forecast are also welcome.


 

No:

027

Title

Surface Modelling and System Simulation of Nature and Nature's Contribution to People

Organizers

TianXiang Yue
Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China

Abstract

This symposium aims at presenting and discussing the recent developments and innovations in surface modelling and system simulation of nature and nature's contribution to people. Specifically, the symposium will collate contributions on the following topics:
- spatial interpolation
- upscaling and downscaling
- data fusion
- model-data assimilation,
- model coupling


 

No:

042

Title

Human and Ecological Wellness Indicators

Organizers

Paul Sutton
University of Denver, USA

Abstract

The University of Denver is embarking upon developing a People's Observatory for the Public Good (POPGood) which will have a flagship report and forum on a suite of spatially explicit indicators of human and ecological well-being. This report will complement and be juxtaposed with CU Boulder's Leeds Business School's annual assessment of business and economic trends and issues in Colorado by (1) developing a consensus set of measurable indicators of human and ecological well-being; (2) preparing an annual/biennial report of trends and related issues; and (3) convening an annual/biennial forum for the release of these findings and an opportunity for discussion concerning their significance. Develop report in time for Earth Day 2021; go public with report and forum in 2021.


 

No:

051

Title

Ecological Modelling of Multidimensional Attributes of Embedded Ecosystems

Organizers

Shastri Nimmagadda
Curtin University, Australia

Abstract

Embedded systems that describe encapsulation of ecosystems manage large volumes and varieties of heterogeneous and multidimensional data. Often, the ecology of ecosystems complicates the data organisation, accessibility, interpretation and presentation in various knowledge domains. Objectives of the current research are to understand the ecologies and their inherent connectivity through integration of different ecosystems and intelligent analysis of data views at varying attribute instances and their sizes. Human, environment and economic ecosystems, if they are embedded in reality, it is crucial to understand their connectivity and interpreting impacts of human ecosystems on economic and environmental ecosystems.
Ontology supportive data warehouse approach, a manifestation of ecosystem ecology framework, is proposed for effective data integration and mining of embedded ecosystems. The current research is aimed at developing various dimensional models, as ontology constructs, representing different ecosystem contexts. In addition, designing and accommodating a multitude of dimensions of diverse digital ecosystems can carry the concept of the ecological ecosystem within a knowledge-based architecture. We examine various dimensions in diverse ecosystems for multidimensional ecological modelling. In addition, fine-grained multidimensional data structuring can add values to data mining, visualisation and interpretation of data patterns, trends and correlations hidden under large volumes of embedded ecosystem data views, drawn from metadata volumes. These multidimensional warehouse repositories are further interpreted in diverse knowledge domains, relevant to a range of ecology researchers, data analysts and ecosystem service providers. The ecological models manifest the phenomenon of inherent connectivity between knowledge-based diverse ecosystems, making human ecosystems more environmentally and economically sustainable.


 

No:

079

Title

Advancing Ecological Restoration in Coastal Systems

Organizers

Ana B Bugnot1, Paul Gribben2, Katherine Dafforn3 and Will Figueira1
1University of Sydney, Australia
2University of New South Wales, Australia
3Macquarie University, Australia

Abstract

Human settlements in coastal areas are modifying habitats through development, contamination and the harvesting of marine resources. This has driven the degradation, and sometimes complete loss, of some coastal habitats, affecting biodiversity and function at the landscape scale. Even though some human stressors, such as resource extraction and contamination, have been ameliorated over the past few decades, many of the lost habitats are not recovering naturally. Hence, habitat restoration strategies have been developed and applied, with varying levels of success. This symposium, led by The Sydney Harbour Research Program (Sydney Institute of Marine Science), aims to bring together current developments in science to inform practice in the restoration of habitat forming species in coastal ecosystems. Researchers, managers and policy makers will be able to exchange ideas and explore novel strategies to improve the success of restoration strategies.


 

No:

081

Title

Mixed-Species Animal Groups: Patterns in Species Interactions

Organizers

Eben Goodale
Guangxi University, China

Abstract

Many animals of diverse taxa move together in mixed-species groups; other species come together in mixed-species aggregations. For many decades the majority of the records on these phenomena were isolated in taxon-specific literature. But the last decade has seen increasing attempts to determine the factors that might favor interspecific associations compared to intraspecific ones generally. This symposium picks up from one at Ecosummit in 2016. Participants of this symposium have been involved in synthesis papers on the conservation of mixed-species bird flocks and the community structure of all types of mixed animal groups. In this year’s symposium, we hope to look specifically at patterns in social networks, phylogenetic composition, and even mimicry within mixed groups. However, we are open to all whose work touches the topic of mixed groups. Similar to the last symposium, we will complement the talks with discussion time to look for interesting topics on which we can work together.


 

No:

083

Title

Microplastics in Waterways and Wastewater: Occurrence, Detection, Characterization and Possible Solution

Organizers

Tanveer Adyel
Monash University, Australia

Abstract

Rapid increasing production and utilization of microplastics (MP), often defined as plastic particles <5mm, raise concerns about the environmental risks globally. Sadly, the huge usage of plastic products and poor management of plastic waste disposal lead to MP being ubiquitously found in aquatic water bodies, including rivers, lakes, estuaries, coastlines and marine ecosystems. Although MP don't pose acute fatal effects on living organisms, they can, however, cause chronic toxicity, which is considered as a key issue in long-term exposure. In recent time wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is also considered an important point source of MP discharge. WWTPs are not designed to capture MP and therefore, a huge amount of MP load can be discharged without or inadequate treatment and can accumulate in the aquatic environment. There is an urgent need to tackle MP pollution; however, there is little information available on how to do so. This session invites contributions, but not limited to: available route of MP generation, analytical methods to detect and characterize MP in aquatic systems and WWTPs, possible fate and transport of MP in such streams, and finally control or removal of MP. Moreover, technological constraints and challenges in this area will also be discussed.

 

No:

084

Title

Stormwater Run-Off Management Using WSUD Techniques

Organizers

Tanveer Adyel
Monash University, Australia

Abstract

Stormwater run-off is a source of organic and inorganic nutrients and other pollutants, mobilizing and redistributing from the point and non-point sources within the catchments. Such nutrients and pollutants loads create challenges in the downstream receiving waterways, leading to water quality impairment, eutrophication and dissolved oxygen depletion, in overall recreational amenities reduction. A holistic management plan to attenuate excess stormwater run-off is, therefore, needed to restore ecological services and mitigate adverse effects within and around the receiving watercourses, and to improve urban liveability. In doing so, different Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) techniques, i.e., constructed wetlands, bio-filters, green roofs, living walls etc. are currently in operation. This session will show the latest advances in stormwater monitoring and management. Particular interest will be given to WSUD design and operation, WSUD restoration, real-time monitoring, sensor networks, modeling, and uncertainty in outcomes.


 

No:

089

Title

A Landscape Approach for Biodiversity Conservation

Organizers

Syed Ainul Hussain
Wildlife Institute of India, India

Abstract

Biodiversity plays a major role in providing fundamental building blocks for many ecosystem services that nature provides. The Aichi Biodiversity Targets addresses the factors affecting biodiversity loss and aims at sustainable use of natural resources. To reduce increasing anthropogenic pressure on biodiversity and their habitat, it is important to develop ecosystem resilience and enhance ecosystem service benefits. Biodiversity conservation needs systematic conservation effort which includes both in-situ and ex-situ conservation through science-based assessment of biodiversity and their habitat, prioritization of conservation zones, promotion of ecosystem and biodiversity conservation in lieu with the socio-economic milieu and promotion of sustainable resource use in consensus with the local livelihood, which can be translated into conservation planning at the ground level.

 

No:

136

Title

Visualising Ecological Complexity with a View towards Improved Land Management

Organizers

Te Kīpa Kēpa Brian Morgan
Mahi Maioro Professionals, New Zealand

Abstract

Indicator thresholds for use with the Mauri Model Decision Making Framework will be created contributing to the basis for a Visualisation Tool. A number of novel conceptual approaches will be shared including; harnessing worldview bias to better understand complexity; using a quadruple bottom line approach to ensure the inclusion of indigenous ways of knowing; adopting a universal metric for indicator measurement; indifference threshold definition; and visualisation techniques for communicating cumulative impact.
Symposium contributors represent the Pohewa Pae Tawhiti (visualising horizons) line of enquiry within the Our Land and Water National Science Challenge, New Zealand. If you are interested in exploring ecological complexity with a uniquely Māori flavour, this is the symposium for you. We may be in Australia, but that rarely stops the All Blacks either!


 

No:

138

Title

Compost Production: A Needed Focus for Effective Utilization of Horticultural Waste, Income Generation and Environmental Sustainability

Organizers

Adeniyi Helen Aderibigbe
National Horticultural Research Institute, Nigeria

Abstract

Compost production is being ranked as one of the most important organic fertilizers and soil amendments. Organic fertilizers are best if composted, because composted material becomes less variable in chemical composition. It improves soil physical properties, the biological status, fertility and consequently crop yield. Horticultural, agricultural, kitchen and yard wastes that would have constituted nuisance to the environment and source of threat to our health are recycled through composting and turned to useful soil amendment. Horticultural wastes (plant and crop residues) were composted. Composting used to take six weeks or more to be completed depending on the type of component materials and turning frequency. For efficient environmental sanitation, economic benefit and healthy organic production all crop and plant residue generated should be composted.


 

 

Speakers Register to Pay
Organised by
 
Elsevier
 
EcoSummit_Foundation
Supported by
 
  • tourism-events Queensland
  • Destination Gold Coast
Sponsors
 
griffith_university
Supporting Publications